Property Types And Their Pros And Cons

Property Types And Their Pros And Cons


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Does age matter?

Of course it may, if you’re looking for a new abode, that is.  Each era will tick a diverse set of boxes for every house hunter. Don’t make your mind up until you’ve read our take on some  of the most likeliest contenders in the market.

1500-1800: Cottage

If your dream home is a cottage, it’s superior to think of it as a fashion, rather than a period. 1500 right through 1800 is the time, when cottages are the existing home of the people. Originally, cottages were the homes of agricultural workers, way back. However, Industrial Innovations brought up versions of cottages built in towns and municipality and they were called railway cottages, miners’ cottages or weavers’ cottages.

Pros:

Thick walls with small, multi-paned windows are the characteristics of the traditional stone-built cottages. Authentic glass is pleasing; just look at the vaguely uneven, imperfect look of pre-factory glass.  Beams and exposed timbers might be visible (especially in the main living areas) fireplaces and if you’re fortunate maybe an aged, working range hob in the kitchen. Several cottages have first floor room in the roof space- so the bathrooms are frequently in the top space with uncovered rafters.

Cons:

Generally, most cottages will be lacking a hallway, so the front entry generally opens directly into the sitting room, In addition to that, quarters can be small in size with low ceilings. Bedrooms on the first floor can be little and often have a bathroom leading instantly to one of the rooms. A predicament is the luggage rack if the bedroom is in the roof- it may have to be customized.

Improvements to add value

If there are several little rooms, the ground floor living space must be modernized. Re-establish fireplace, add storeroom, and refurbish original floor tiles or bricks which are often still in spot, but unseen underneath layers of newer floors.

1714-1830: Georgian

Elegant” is the word that springs to mind when recounting a Georgian House. The evenness and grace of Classical architecture are the admired quality of the Georgians and the houses show that. Three or four storey townhouse, with gracefully balanced sash windows, stuccoed exterior to the ground floor and an impressive front door are the trait of a typical Georgian house.

Pros:

Flats in Georgian houses are a more inexpensive way of experiencing Georgian style.  Georgian houses can be roomy, while Georgian town house will often be divided into three or more.  Each one will have a discrete character – lower ceilings and a garden, cellars have tiny rooms, the central apartment will benefit from the height and stylishness of utilising the ‘public’ rooms of a larger house, and the top floor will once again have smaller rooms, but perhaps the use of a roof terrace on the flat roof.  The elegant sash windows were usually made up of nine to 12 stylish small panes with lean glazing bars. Genuine plasterwork and fireplaces will make it appealing to upcoming consumer.

Cons:

Georgian houses have been here long enough for unsuitable “improvements” to be made!

Larger rooms may be divided, in houses that have been split into flats. Spoiling the symmetry and grace.  Stucco, brickwork and exterior may be damaged as well.

Improvements to add value

Make sure that sash windows are properly proportioned, which almost unquestionably means having surrogate custom made. Missing or damaged plasterwork and other original features must be restored.  Original floors would have been rock-hard oak, wide boards and enhancing fire surrounds ended the lines of Classical architecture.

1830-1900:  Victorian

Typical and most attractive period property are the few characteristics of a Victorian house. They are mature enough to have a specific ‘period’ style, but less likely than older constructions to be listed, costly or in need of pricey and expert restoration.  That doesn’t mean that Victorian houses are an economical option, but they are extensively accessible, offer well proportioned living places and refurbishment are uncomplicated.

Pros:

There are thousands of Victoria terraced houses, as well as grand scale family homes. Red brick exterior are striking with altering details around windows. Three bedroom properties often have a loft conversion, adding another bedroom and bathroom. Original slate roofs, fireplaces, dado rails, skirting boards and coving are great, if undamaged and bathrooms may be liberally sized if rehabilitated from a bedroom (bathrooms didn’t become common place until the 1890s). Original windows and doors are a vast bonus, especially if they still have their original glazing.

Cons:

Without a second thought, the original features of Victorian houses have been discarded. Houses can be draughty if windows and doors are ill-fitting. Windows are especially likely to have been interchanged with UPVC or pseudo-Victorian styles. Halls and stairs may be spoiled, split into flats, coving, plasterwork, hallways and stairs may be spoiled, losing their sense of proportion as well as original features, this will happen if rooms are divided.

Improvements to add value:

Hallway floors have frequently been altered – orginals were parquet or colourful encaustic tiles, investing in alternative (look in salvage and reclamation yards) will make an optimistic impact on the overall glance of the house.  Think about cavity-wall and loft insulation to continue fuel bills in check.

1930s:  Arts & Crafts

In 1920s and 30s new house style were brought to the

UK, Arts & Crafts style. Which accentuate a return to ‘handmade’ houses and furniture and attain its artistic peak around the turn of the century – was a momentous influence, by the side of the ‘modern’ look that started in the 1920s.  Builders rented and customized pure Arts & Crafts and modernists design ideas to mass produce semi-disconnected houses, which went up at a rate of knots, in small groups or expansion.

Pros:

In 1930s there are huge bands of homes; they demonstrate the suburban landscape. And make high quality family homes.  Mostly, the homes have three bedrooms – one of which might be a small ‘box room’; but there is usually space for a loft conversion. They often have a generous sized conservatory or sun room at the back, leading off the dining room (or second reception room), because these houses were quite wide. The desirable stained glass windows were at the front of the house and facade doors often have a square or oval stained glass panel at the top. Pretty porches and red tiles roofs all look attractive and are often found intact, next to the double bays to the front.

Cons:

Inappropriate windows are often seen in 1930s homes, due to a lot of houses. Garish colors were painted in pebble dash exteriors. Flat roofs and metal windows and may be in a sorry state, these can be seen in 1930s “modern” houses. Plus flat roofs are renowned for leakage problems and metal window frames can weather roughly if not looked after, as well as letting in breeze and moisture.

Improvements to add value

Concentrate with the exterior.  The mock Tudor styles of 1930s homes look very much advanced if spruced up, e.g. pebble dash painted white, beams stained and refurbished and windows in good order.

1960s:  Functional

The first things that spring to mind when 1960s architecture crops up in a discussion are Gloomy high-rise tower blocks. But there are several 1960s family homes that are convenient and fascinating today as they were when they were first built. A 1960s house, if restored in its original style, is a first-class scaffold for many of today’s interior décor trends – simple hardwood or laminate flooring, neutral paint colours, contemporary hole-in-the wall fireplaces and sleek fitted kitchens.

Pros:

The features of these homes are concrete tiled roofs, pre-cast flues for the trendy gas fires that were installed and relatively large kitchens. Styles swerve dramatically from boxy three or four bedroom semis and detached homes to ‘modern’ split levels and bungalows.

Styles are basically natural and simple with very little interior detail.  Most will have central heating.

Cons:

Now we’re 40 years on, many original 1960s windows will have been replaced by UPVC double-glazing (although these at least look less out of place than when they were installed in older homes). Out of period additions that may have been made, such as old-fashioned fireplaces, ‘period’ style coving and ‘traditional’ front doors are the most common drawbacks with ‘modern’ 1960s houses.  Radiators may be starting to decay or leak, and so need restoring.

Improvements to add value

Keep things plain and straightforward. Strip out period style coving, fancy skirting boards and ceiling roses – none of which would have featured in the décor when the house was built. Beware of adding a period style conservatory – they end up looking rather out of place.  Go for a modern ‘glass box’ design instead.

2007:  Brand new

If a brand-new house is on the cards, then you’re spoilt for choice! Whether you want a cosy family home, a conversion in an old school or factory or want an ultra modern flat that’s all glass and stainless steel, you’ll find something to go with. Today’s new houses are built to National House Building Council standards and guidelines, and come with a ten-year guarantee.

Pros:

Some major advantages of buying new: Insulation, new windows, efficient boilers and central heating systems, building guarantees and warranties. Mainly three and four bedroom homes will have an en-suite bathroom for the main bedroom, as well as a family bathroom and doubtless a utility room and downstairs cloakroom, too. You can generally choose your own finishes (flooring, paint colours, kitchen cabinets). Plus, there are also quite a few deals accessible when buying direct from a developer, so look out for money saving offers.

Cons:

Some people find brand new houses a bit characterless and if you’re buying on a new estate or development, you could end up living on a building site until it’s all finished.  Gardens take a good few years to establish and there may not be much sense of neighbourhood at first.  Be sure to check vicinity facilities (shops, doctors, schools) are sufficient if it’s a very new development.